November 21, 2017 
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Two-headed Front

       

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 By Dave I.

09/05/2009  7:39PM

Hello Micheal,

I recommend, council from the Pacific Legal Foundation, and net working with Mining associations. To defend your position.
I believe your rights should be grand fathered into your mine as these subsequent environmental laws are alleged to be involved were made post establishment of your mine.
 By Michael Miller

09/05/2009  2:19PM

For six years this topic, Two-headed Front waited for another entry. It was never merged into the Miscellaneous Topic, another topics or deleted. It waited because of its powerful entries, written by some people who still participate in the public discussions we share. I don’t know why, but this morning I reread the nine entries by five interested participants (starting at the first entry on 04/11/2002) and thought, “You have something to say today and have wondered where to put it. Why not this Two-headed Front topic that has warranted its place to remain as one of the limited topics?”

Two-headed Front: right or wrong; fair or unjust; legal or illegal; responsible behavior or irresponsible behavior; we verses they; us verses them; fight or flight. Maybe the other four writers or others will voice their comments to the concept of a Two-headed Front.

Here’s the latest about real gold mining in California. On behalf of the People of the State of California, the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, Central Valley Region (CRWQCB) notified the California Attorney General (CAG) that it wanted to file a very comprehensive lawsuit against our mining company for about $3 million dollars in alleged damages, civil penalties and injunctive and other equitable relief. Just for the sport of it the CAG tossed in my name as a co-defendant. The case, NO 7019 was filed in Superior Court in Downieville on May 01, 2009, and served in July. We answered the complaint on August 20, 2009 and denied culpability. There are five causes of action.

Does this sound familiar? One can suggest a pattern. When the California District Attorney Association, lied to the Sierra County Grand Jury to get an indictment for murder against the Company, its mine manager and its president all interest in significant investments to development our property ceased. How will significant investors in advancing California’s greatest high-grade gold district view this specious claim for $3 million react to this news? Anyone care to guess? What timing!

Why were so many requests by the Company to issue a permit that fits the specifics of the mine operation ignored? Why did the CRWQCB ignore a hearing to air out the obvious difference in interpreting the regulation by its staff and the professional miners? Why did CAG take on and write such a specious lawsuit? Could all those people who have been telling me over the past decade that there are people who want this mine to close be correct?

If you are not outraged by past events that have happened to this small mine and Company, you may want to take an interest today. The CAG wants to ignore the corporate security laws that have served America well for a long time. If a corporate president is personally responsible for being responsible and protecting its shareholders (owners) against unwarranted attacks, all 350 million American citizens should know that this is the new direction of America. Plenty of laws exist to hammer foul play by corporate officers and directors (which I certainly support). The Sixteen to One has no guilt in this case (nor do I) and it would not take much of a due diligence review by CAG to agree.

The CRWQCB told the CAG that unidentified additional defendants are also pretty nasty. It alleges that Original Sixteen to One Mine, Inc is a “mere shell” and that other nasty does are using “the corporate entity merely as a shield against liability.” Wow, the CAG must believe it also. It has a fiduciary responsibility to the people of this state and to the legal requirements set forth in California’s codes and the California State Bar Association. Our corporation is almost 100 years old and has survived to become the oldest American public corporation operating in America. It did not accomplish this through illegal activities. (I wonder if CDAA wants to come back to Sierra County, lie to the grand jury and seek criminal charges again.)

One issue is monitoring the water or the lack thereof. I’m not going into details. CRWQCB wanted 1,440 annual tests at a cost of over $25,000. The mine tested the water for twenty years and the results are very predictable, depending of the season and weather. It requested a review by staff to lower the requirements. Yes, by necessity many of the tests were not complete. BUT, where was the environmental harm?

Well, CRWQCB told our elected Attorney General and his staff of lawyers that a serious public nuisance has occurred because the mine limited testing the water and discharged waste and pollutants into the “navigable” Kanaka Creek. How many readers are familiar with Kanaka Creek, a designated intermittent creek that goes underground in many places plus has a water diversion dam downstream from the mine. Also the stated discharge is naturally occurring elements that pre-exist the present waterways by 130 million years or so. Does the CAG have accountability to the court? To the people? To the mine? I hope so and that all of them will be held accountable for the assertions made in this lawsuit.

What does CRWQCB want? It wants money. Upon research it appears that this agency is funded from fees it charges and penalties it collects. All of this is conducted “in the best interest of the public”, you and me and those hard working blue collar miners who so desperately want to go back to work, earn a living and buy some new shoes for the kids and a pizza for the night. Anyone interested?

Klaus Kolb has professionally (means integrity and more) committed to help again. He knows the mine does not have the funds to wage an environmental fight against the stupidity of these allegations and the willful misappropriation of the intent of the legislature, who passed laws regarding water quality in California. Hey, let’s kill off all the productive workers. Let’s lean into the producers of materials useful to society. Let’s put them all out of business by enacting impossible conditions to operate and then sending them a bill for service. Let’s do it because we care so much and have such a superior grasp of nature than the farmers, loggers, miners or other providers of physical goods living in and working in rural California.

Let it be known that rural America is under attack again by white collar folks sitting in air conditioned offices in Sacramento or San Francisco, maybe even as far away as Washington D.C. Take a position. Help stop another nail into the greatnesses of America. Make freedom ring. Do it for yourself. Do it for future generations. Do it for a great gold mine in California. Do it for the miners and their families. Do it for me or do it for George.
 By Rick

06/22/2003  8:25PM

For those of you at the meeting who heard Mike allude to the battles he's fought on behalf of the mine and it's shareholders (us), I want to re-iterate a point he glossed over:

Mike is not a lawyer, yet his convictions to the cause led him into new ground, right there where another lawyer might have sidetracked the issue with litigation. Mike used a technique that doesn't come with a law degree, instead with a moral conscience. Tell the truth and an honest Judge will rule accordingly. That's what happened. Mark's unfortunate accident shouldn't have been the catalyst.

There is nothing bigger than putting one's friend's accidental death into proper perspective. Yet the need to do so exists, and Mike's point of perspective did just that. He dignified Mark's death by fighting on his behalf, and the spirit of personal responsibility that is so crucial to success.

Now it's our turn. Let's all again recognize the real issue here and as the gentleman who raised the toast to Mike's perseverence (for those of you not there, it was a dry toast, no distilled spirits needed), toast to mining and self-determination, which continues to takes a back-seat on the old Two-Headed Front (previous Forum discussion, check it out) once again: how to go mining and keep the politics at bay.

So thanks, Mike, for the fight. And thanks Johnathon for all your hard work.

Here's to the next pocket.
 By Michael Miller

05/27/2003  10:10AM

The annual report will be mailed to shareholders this Wednesday. By the weekend I will offer some comments in the Forum and bring our web readers up to date. For those who write and those who read the forum, your participation is inspiring. As we move through the minefields of operating a gold mine in the United States, shared truth is a weapon of preservation. During private moments of deep thought, I shake my head in wonderment as to why a six thousand-year-old industry and a hundred-year-old specific company still must deal with preservation. Collectively we have more than persevered lately. We have won the battles. The business of mining gold is before us now. There are other issues. For example. On June 10 an administrative hearing is scheduled in Nevada City with MSHA. The evidence and truth clearly say that Mark died in a tragic accident. It will be entertaining to watch federal lawyers try to twist an accident into a crime. It will be interesting to see a federal administrative lawyer (judge) objectively practicing the law. It will be important for Americans to learn if their tax dollars are going to support perjurers.
 By Rick

05/22/2003  9:49PM

Yeah!!

Okay, now we do it.
Goldmaster, Bluejay, Goldfx and everyone else, let's get busy, call some people up on the phone, tell them to come look at the web-site so that when they come to Shareholder's Day they'll go back home and write stuff here...How about Open House Day, so that just because they're not yet a sheareholder they feel the bug, get involved...

Now I'll relate two stories, both of which are most likely similar as to how we all got bitten by the bug, so that we all send the bug out to bite someone else:

Many years ago I was listening to the radio (AM 1530) on a Sunday morning sometime between 5 AM and 7 AM...Bob Simms hosting what then was called the Outdoor Show, focusing then on things outdoors. (It's now dedicated to fishing, mostly, and I still listen faithfully.) The guest was a guy named Michael Miller from a gold mine called the Original Sixteen to One who wasn't dropping the dream, said he was dedicated to not only the historical significance of the Original Sixteen to One Mine but just as much to tapping the riches down inside.

Wow. I'd been panning for flakes, and this got my attention, big time. Flakes were good (size doesn't matter when passion's the issue), but this was something that made my blood run.

Cutting to the chase: I bought shares and went up there, met some incredible people who exhibited incredible passion for freedom and (here I go...), Constitutionally defined freedom to chase whatever's there. I remember walking down to the mill-site looking around at all that white rock, completely baffled as to why some people would consider these piles "ruining the Earth."

It was the Earth, nice and white, and maybe full of gold, all over the place, on top of the ground. No way was some human any more powerful than the Big Guy or Gal (God) ruining the Earth. It was beautiful. So was the tour......


Second story:

Back in high-school (1968-1972) I lived in West Covina, LA area, and to make a few bucks for when I finally went to college at UC Davis, I took a job with a steel foundry, owned at that time by my best friend's family, in ...get this...Colton, East LA. I spent the days with my hands and fingers within milli-inches of a five-foot tall diamond grinder wheel, shaving off extraneous steel casting blobs that wouldn't make the grade, all these huge buckets of molten steel dumping around me. I remember the smell.... Most of the guys around me were missing fingers. (Thankfully by the time I left for school I still had all ten fingers, since I've gone on to make music performance a large part of my life.) Today you don't go into Colton, unless you want to get shot; or unless you want to get shot on film. Yup, the steel foundry's still there, but not the production of steel products. Now they shoot movies there. Yes, the mine is an incredible set for movies (I think Mike's been courting film producers already), but when movies are made at the Original Sixteen to One, let's insure it's because active mining is happening!

Two stories told, but not to sound off my own horn. Instead, telling you all this is an example of what we need to do to get the ball rolling.

Now. Yesterday. Tomorrow.

We're all extremely passionate people. I know this, even though I haven't even met you yet (I think.) And since passion is power, I have a good feeling about this. I don't normally open up personal angles, but, this is a time to do exactly that: spread the word, tell stories that brought us to this passion.

Here's the nut: Many times in gold-mining history, stories of new rushes and new discoveries have made many chase after false dreams. But this mine of ours is the Real Deal.
 By bluejay

05/22/2003  9:03AM

A lesson can be learned through the close observation of one of Mother Natures's little creatures. How does a spider exist? It sets up a little working den and spins its web. The success of the food gathering and life sustaining process is determined from where the prospecting is done. How many spiders routinely die and shrivel up inside an inclosed structure as compared to those that thrive well in the natural environment?

What has to be done is, the capturing of one's energy or a groups's energy for personal satisfaction along with the chance that it could be mutually benefitting as well to the Company.

How do we do this? As starters, a few ideas will be mentioned but the real resource is within the shareholders and all their combined life experiences. What organizations do your belong to or know of? Plan a day or two in Alleghany for a special annual gathering, meeting or adventure. Set up tents or bring your motor homes if it will be an over-nighter.

Take pictures of all of our properties and submit them to the motion picture producing companies for exterior and interior shooting possibilities. The companies will catalog them under subject matter. The companies pay handsomely for property use. If a picture is done here sell the people that come the idea of gold ownership. Let them closely inspect the Company that mines it and sell them gold products. Let the Company entertain their interests when they are not working.

Invite video and motion picture departments of universities as well to come and use the area for shooting.

Locate and invite bicycle, hiking, camera, bird watching and other clubs to come and use parts of the property and sell them too.

Alleghany is a remote little mining town frequented by an extremely small amount of people. If we don't spin some kind of sticky web, how can we expect people to have an interest in the Company?
 By gfxgold

05/21/2003  7:42PM

I know what you mean, Rick. Checking out the "Forum" is like driving around the block to see if one of the neighbors has a new car in the diveway. If you need a little heat and passion, how about that rising gold price! Now, as for getting the "Sixteen" noticed (and I assume you mean by investors), Networking the shareholders might be fruitful. In other words, if you're a shareholder, go to the annual shareholders meeting and get those feelings back as to why you invested in the mine. Holding the "Whopper" or any other specimen should do it! Then, the next time your asked, "What did you do over the weekend"? You can pull out some pictures of you holding a big chunk of gold or maybe headed underground and tell them about California's oldest operating hard-rock gold mine up in Alleghany, and how you're one of the shareholders and... "Say, you got a few bucks you want to invest"? "We're thinking about sinking a new shaft over on the Red Star property". All it takes is a new story being told to someones rich uncle. But, if that doesn't raise some working capital, at least you had a fun weekend. Hopefully, someone will be putting the shareholders meeting info on the homepage as promised.
 By Rick

05/14/2003  9:45PM

Goldmaster, you obviously have the dream in your blood, no previous offense intended. Unfortunately there's been a stream of public sector regulation with no other intent than making political points directed to the uninformed masses who actually believe the word "MINE" equates with the destruction of the environment. (I have so many first hand stories to this effect, you wouldn't believe the ignorance that is best balanced with logic, but still isn't digested with reason. But, I digress.) Should I address their concerns (how drilling a core sample would hurt a mosquito,) sure enough, someone would file a lawsuit or appoint an administrative sap to prove how mosquitoes are ill-effected by core-drilling, how mosquitoes might become locally extinct in Allegany (note the word 'locally' in the extinct reference . . . a contradiction in species evolutionary theory which I hope to relate here soon); next we're out of the core-drilling business.

True.

Goldmaster, you'll understand the obstructioninst issue best after a thorough review of the issues thwarting progress brought to light on this very Forum page. It serves well to scan all the Topics, all the way to the bottom of the Topic, which will glean previous perspectives lost in the way the Forum is currently set up.

It's there to read about.

Lately itseems like everyone wants to become part of the party. That's a good clue.

That being: what MM and the OAu has done to survive the latest onslaught from the CDAA, the CRWQCD, and whoever else; just look at the advice now getting thrown into the mix ( after a decision has finally shed some light on the accusation of Mark F.'s tragic accident.)

It would be a genuine shame if an actual interested party with investment on the brain (good idea) were to become distracted all due to my comments here, since such concerns are intended for positive outcome rather than administrative posturing.

Not me. Just like all of us.

Goldmaster, it just seemed to me that positioning was your angle. So, if I'm off my rocker, I apologize. (Damn, this PC apology stuff really isn't me. My guess is also it doesn't define the OAu Miner.)

But all you interested parties out there watching this scuffle, don't go away, please. While it's still about money, it's still about doing it right. . . .When stuff stinks, you fight back to make it right.
 By lynwood

05/09/2002  12:48AM

The flagrant and downright deceitful performance of exercising administrative law. Four players represented our government. Three sat at a table facing the fourth, who was the judge. The lawyer’s name was Isabelle something. The inspector was James L. Weisbeck. I remember his name because MMM repeated it throughout the hearing. There was one event that evoked spontaneous and healthy laughter from ten of the eleven people in the room. The US attorney kept objecting to the questions MMM posed to the inspector. She also continued to object to the questions MMM asked the miners and geologists who took the oath to testify. MMM usually objected to the objection. The judge almost always sustained the government’s objection. The judge was also a little slow to respond which was either his natural state of mind or he was old or he was unfamiliar with mines and mining. He may have been a whiz at other mines, but he exhibited little understanding of this hardrock underground gold mine. This is what MMM continually and relentlessly brought into the record. The funny event was…MMM asked a question. The lawyer objected. MMM sustained her objection to his own question. The judge just sat there and seemed confused. The lawyer said you cannot sustain my objection after everyone calmed down. Knowingly or unknowingly MMM proved his point.

Five citations were contested. Each one abused the purpose of the law and MSHA requirements that places the responsibility of safety. Weisbeck graduated from inspector school in March. Five months later he goes to the Sixteen To One mine. It is his first underground inspection. In less than one hour he issues a citation for inadequate warning of a chute overhead in the tunnel. In the next hour he goes to a spot where he writes a citation for inadequate support and reckless disregard by the miner to check for dangerous ground that could hurt a miner. He then found an empty acetylene container against a wall in the shop, which in his judgement could fall over and hurt a miner. The last one seemed so ridiculous but a plate over a restart button lost one of its screws. It was in the janitor supply room. He issued a citation on the merits that someone could get electrocuted. All five of these allegations lacked credible evidence to support them. They should be dismissed, but I doubt will be.

In addition to harassment beyond the limits of law my government breached its fiduciary requirement to me. I have been damaged. Why? The Sixteen to One miners face extinction and they represent the last of the deep hard rock guys. It is my culture as a Californian and as an American. The culture would be gone. We would only see it in a museum. This is why I asked the question. Could someone do a better job at keeping the gold miners working to find gold? I saw the elephant. MMM and his miners have a great hand. It appears to be as hard to dig it out of them as it is to find the high-grade gold. So, my culture can be found in an area known as the Northern Mines. It is a culture that goes back to recorded times, but Richard Henry Dana, who wrote "Two Years Before the Mast" (mid 1830’s) ignites the Pacific coast culture. Nobody was checking the Sierra Nevada mountains for wealth as Dana cruised the coast picking up cow hides. Since he was born a Massachusettian and sailed from Boston, my culture incorporates the Atlantic coast.

It was the gold miners who rushed to and developed California into an American state who laid down the roots of the West. The state began providing its gold to the world in 1848. The Northern Mines gold continued to ignite the Pacific Coast culture. It must continue. I saw the character similarities of those miners in the administration hearing to the gold miners 150 years ago. Our tax dollars were authorized to help American miners. Safe mining was recognized as important to the people in 1977, when the feds got involved. Its only purpose was to protect miners. The most impressive piece of evidence on record is a statement of the miners. The govt. lawyer objected and objected each time it was offered as evidence. MMM read it into the record when Weisbeck was testifying. He kept trying with his miners and each time he later addressed the previous objection. Finally he entered it himself. The judge had to overrule the last try of the fed lawyer to keep it out of evidence and now it becomes a legal oath or manifesto of the Sixteen to One. It is a cultural document which I want to see in print. If available I will buy the transcript, if I get the opportunity.

Our society has drifted far from American mores, culture, law, heritage and common sense. Thomas Payne, where are you now that your country needs you again?
 By Rick

04/12/2002  6:59AM

So important is it to review the response by gfxgold in the topic about Future below, I decided to expand with a new topic rather than upstaging it by responding in that title.

As many of you are probably aware, I frequently add my perspectives to the Forum both in responses and in new thought, but I feel a need to clarify that I have never worked as an employee of the mine although it may sound that way at times. However, I have looked closely at the obstacles that confront success, occasionally as on Shareholder's Days underground, but mostly above ground. Clearly these are obstacles defining two entirely different headings: below ground so well explained in gfxgold's comments, above ground so poorly understood by shortsighted questions defining "success and failures" in the face of political obstacles thrown at the Original Sixteen to One Mine for political gain.

This is a Two-Headed Front. The mine is fortunate to have the competence of Jonathan Farrell as mine manager who makes the underground decisions that formulate success, ultimately the person responsible for the discovery and recovery of gold. The mine is also fortunate to have Michael Miller to formulate success against a never ending political battle being waged against United States Constitutional rights, waged against unchecked political appointments bent on taking advantage of Alleghany's high profile, waged against the very institution that formulated this great State of California, eventually and indirectly waged against the stock values.

I implore anyone interested to review the other topics on the Forum page that are discussed along these lines (specifically those in response to the arsenic issues), as one would see the depth of the political challenges. With these perspectives in mind, there is no doubt in my mind that there has been no "failure" by the actions of the C.E.O. of the Original Sixteen to One, rather success instead.

"Salted success" is another form of "failure" and we must differentiate the difference between that and honesty defined by truth.
 By gfxgold

04/11/2002  10:10PM

Alleghany may be the home for "High-Grade" gold mines in California and the "Sixteen to One" is the most famous. However, the nature of the high-grade deposit is a game of inches. Should you drill one more round because all indications are that the next high-grade deposit is only inches away? Or, should you cut your losses and go in a different direction? Or should you go in three, four, or six different directions? Using information from geologists, history of past discoveries, the latest electronic technology, a lot of hard work from some of the best miners, a little luck and your best guess and you can still come up empty handed. It's been said that any successful CEO needs to make good decisions fifty one percent of the time. A CEO will have friends and detractors, but few equals. Mike Miller is someone who has thrown himself into his work. He is constantly thinking of ways to benefit the mine. He knows that there are families counting on a paycheck, even if he must not pay himself. Sometimes, he must take a hard stand or unpopular stand to defend the welfare of the mine, it's employees, and it's stockholders. He has done this for about fifteen years since OAU was created. How many ounces of gold does there need to be in the next high-grade deposit to make everything OK? Fifty? Five thousand? Fifty Thousand? Or, just enough to get a "feel good" story about the "Sixteen to One" back on the "Six o'clock News"!

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