December 14, 2018 
 Friday 
 
 

Forum
Topic:
Stock exchange listing

       

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 By RyanBaum

02/26/2013  9:17AM

Brokerage fims have now moved to charging a substantial fee for issuing a certificate--often now as much as $500. Any advice on other means to take delivery of shares currently held in street name?
 By bluejay

11/27/2012  8:26PM

Brokerage firms today won't let you sell a security unless it is already in their possession. Not like the old days when you had five days to bring in the certificate to the broker. These rules were changed so they could hold your assets for as long as possible for their own interests.

The reasons no shares have been transferred is for a couple of reasons: either the firm that acted as the sellers broker had the shares in street name and bought them for themselves or the trades were a naked short sale and there are no shares behind the sale to transfer.

What surprises me is that the pawn shop atmosphere of the grey market didn't trade them at a fraction of a penny.

I know Mike doesn't like this idea but if it were for the word "gold" in our corporate name the shares would probably trade higher in New York.
 By Michael Miller

11/26/2012  1:00PM

Several processes are going on regarding stock certificates and safe deposit boxes. Most banks send notices to safe deposit holders when rent is delinquent. The times may vary but several notices will be sent before a box is cleaned out. The contents (inventoried and secured elsewhere) are held for seven years before the State gets involved. The bank notifies the State and the property is for default (to escheat). The State then holds power to dispose of the contents.

Our transfer agent has not received a request for transfer for these low selling shares. My question is, “How is the stock certificate transferred?” Someone must pay for the transfer: the seller; the buyer; a brokerage house that transfers it into “street name” and then sells it to a customer. This is why I always recommend taking a certificate for Original Sixteen to One Mine, Inc.

Our files have a history of certificates going back to 1911. While it is not an issue right now, short sellers must put up shares as collateral for the short (usually borrowed from another source). Over the years I have cautioned anyone from selling Original Sixteen to One Mine, Inc. short. You likely can speculate why. Like gold, a stock certificate is easily stored at home or office.
 By gary jeffres

11/23/2012  9:46PM

"If anyone can add light to this, please post you findings."

stock certifices left in safe dipost boxes over 3 years without any action by the holder of the box or part of estates that fall into the hands of the state of calif get sold and the state does not care if they get the real value for the stock certifices they will just sell them and put the money in a account till the money is claimed
 By Rick

11/21/2012  5:13PM

Mike, sure looks like its a youngster...maybe he'll use the $45 to go on a gold adventure...
 By Michael Miller

11/21/2012  2:29PM

I also have zero information as to why a shareholder would sell 300 shares for fifteen cents or $45. What would the minimum commission be? Does the buyer pay his broker a commission?

Until a couple of items are fixed, don't look to the Company to get too excited about any stock trades. There are very few small companies in the gold business that ignore promoting their stock. In fact that is what most do all the time. My capital in Sixteen to One is patient capital. I look ahead to better times. What in the world did the seller do with the $45?

Our issues will be solved, the sooner the better. Thanks, cw3343. I look at our stock market page once in awhile. Those sellers could have really scored if they checked our web site. A buyer stepped up with a $0.30 bid.

These trades interest me because I have never met a shareholder in thirty years that would treasure a few bucks more that a small position in this company. If anyone can add light to this, please post you findings.
 By cw3343

11/21/2012  11:58AM

RE the info below - Just to clarify, it was not me, and I have zero info on these trades - just posted so that people are aware of what is going on.
 By cw3343

11/21/2012  11:56AM

For what it's worth...
Recent trades:

11/15 2,550 at 0.20
11/20 7,225 at 0.20
11/20 525 at 0.18
11/20 525 at 0.18
11/20 300 at 0.15


 By RyanBaum

11/13/2012  1:36PM

First Northern is actually listed as "FNRN." Yes, they, too, are closely held and not wanting wide distribution of shares.

They, however, have ample capital and are content with their slow, steady growth.

I would recommend that OSTO consider some means of raising funds from shareholders via a rights offering or other mechanism. While OSTO has been willing to consider large block investors, none has come forward over the past several years.

Can we now utilize the small business exemptions for easier capital raising to go to current shareholders? Something like a new share for $0.25 for every 4 shares already held?
 By martin newkom

09/26/2012  1:31PM

Speaking of "pink sheets" I know
of a bank in Dixon and Sacramento
Calif., The First Northern Bank
that has been in business for a
long,long time and their stock
has been listed as FNBB which
being "Bullitin Board" may be the
euivalent of "pink sheets" or
close to it. I think the owners
have held their stock for years
and don't want their stock to
come under view of "raiders".
 By martin newkom

09/26/2012  1:23PM

For those interested, Bank of the West is/was a subsidiary of BNP
Paribas, a french bank which has
gone through many phases of mergers and acquisions, it seems.
I know for a fact that there are
frenchmen who still come up from
San Francisco to mine the creeks
in and around Alleghany like my
wife's french great grandfather
did in the 1850's
to Alleghany to mine the cree
 By Michael Miller

09/26/2012  11:49AM

Word from an existing shareholder who bought the 8000 shares said that TD Ameritrade told him the one cent sale was bogus. I encourage everyone fortunate enough to purchase share to ask for a share certificate. We can get information about the seller from our transfer agent. A short seller of Sixteen to One is a fool.
 By cw3343

09/25/2012  2:44PM

On 9/19:
1401 shares at 0.25, and 1500 shs at 0.20


To Lake's message below. volume has a lot to do with shares outstanding, or float -which probably is not much with OSTO
 By Lake

09/14/2012  11:00AM

Wouldn't volume + price improve if at least listed on OTC:BB? Anyone has any clue of what minable reserves are? Tks
 By bluejay

08/11/2012  8:50PM

The Pink Sheets are no different that a pawn shop operation.

The way the pawn shop profits is usually buying from an ignorant person or from someone needing a fast liquidation with little consideration for price(drug addict) and then waiting it out until a value buyer shows up.

You would think that stock and bond organizations under the supposed watchful eye of regulators would fear them for dropping a stock from 37 1/2 cents to one cent in a heart beat but then again, the SEC has lost their creditability with respected people in the industry long ago.
 By gerald

08/11/2012  4:44PM

i will sell 200 shares at discount broker for 0.49 a share to get the broker price to 0.49
 By Rockroby

08/11/2012  3:40PM

Thank you for the quick reply, I'm not a seller at .50 cents or a $1.00 as the price of gold climbs this company will only become more valuable.
It's only a matter of time, may the next blast be golden.
 By Michael Miller

08/11/2012  2:19PM

As considered an “insider” I am not a seller for a dollar so the reference to .50 cents makes no sense to me. Now, a penny? If a penny represents anything of value to our shareholders and company, I cannot find it. My guess is the sale has something to do with a transfer in an estate. The only way the Company knows details about transaction is when the transfer agent reports activity…who supplied the stock certificate and what name is going on the new stock certificate.

My arrogance may be showing should I suggest it is some attempt by people who have no equity interest in our corporation but realize that they should. After all, where can one find a 100 year old American gold operator that operates mines it outright owns, has operating permits and an experienced crew and infrastructure in place? When these reports of penny sales turn up, a comment heard more than once is: it may be lawyers or accountants working to clean up an estate. I feel sadness for the dead person if this is true. He or she wanted to bequeath value to heirs and held the opinion that owning a small piece of a gold mine in California was a good idea.

Another though is that if the sale/purchase was through a stock broker, that company and its broker are incompetent, unprofessional or white collar criminals and the seller should call his or her lawyer right now to seek damages for fraud.
 By Rockroby

08/11/2012  8:21AM

Someone managed to get 8100 shares yesterday for a penny.
From .375 down to a penny, any thoughts on why?
This stock should be at least .50 cents a share.
 By bluejay

01/02/2012  10:29PM

Would you give your pink slip to your car or your deed to your home to an investment bank? Then why would you accept their crap to retain your stock certificates?

There should never be a middleman between you and your paid-in-full property. What happened at the brokerage firm MF Global could be the small beginning, $1.2 billion initial customer account loss, to bigger such events to follow.

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